Georgia Says

The Augusta (Ga.) Chronicle on U.S. media’s treatment of the Tea Party movement: The media in this country slandered and libeled the Tea Party movement in an effort to strangle it in its crib.

As others have noted as well, first the media tried ignoring the movement. Then they mocked it. Then they attacked it and mischaracterized it.

In contrast, they embraced, exalted and promoted the liberal, ill-focused, often chaotic and sometimes violent “Occupy” protests.

We’re not aware of any significant Tea Party unruliness, despite its non-exclusive membership, and it was never the least bit ambiguous about what it wanted: an end to out-of-control government spending that is putting posterity, and perhaps our own posteriors, at great financial risk.

Period.

Yet, our media quite purposely and disingenuously continue to misrepresent that very simple message.

CBS reporter Elizabeth Palmer recently compared theocratic, autocratic presidential candidates in Iran to the Tea Party, saying, “In U.S. terms, it was as if all the candidates for the presidency came from the Tea Party.”

That’s just the height of lunacy - to compare the oppressive ruling theocracy’s approved candidates in one of the world’s strictest Islamic states to Americans who merely want a financially sound federal government.

It’s not just a continuance of the slander our media have slung at the good people of the Tea Party. It’s also just irrational hysteria.

It’s worthy of note that some outside of this country seem to understand the American Revolution-inspired Tea Party movement better than our liberal news media do.

British historian and professor Niall Ferguson was quoted in the Telegraph of London recently as saying, “If young Americans knew what was good for them, they would all be in the Tea Party.” Western democracies’ famously dire financial conditions are even worse than advertised, Ferguson notes.

For this, good Americans are being compared to Islamic fundamentalists. 

The Albany (Ga.) Herald on Edward Snowden’s intention to hurt U.S.: Edward Snowden, currently the focus of a vortex of political intrigue, has been called a whistleblower and a traitor. It’s becoming more evident that he is the latter, a planted traitor whose goal from the beginning was to cripple his nation’s security.

His decision to hide out in Hong Kong was suspicious, but it has become more so with his movement to Russia and apparent plans to go to Ecuador by way of Cuba.

However you look at it, Snowden is cooperat- ing — and getting cooperation from — nations that have human rights and freedom track records that are the very things Snowden pur- ports to despise.

The South China Morning Post took the story even deeper. Snowden, the newspaper reported, in a June 12 interview admitted that he sought a job as systems administrator for Booz Allen Hamilton for the purpose of gaining access to classified information on the National Security Agency’s surveillance programs.

That admission recasts Snowden’s avowed pristine motives as espionage.

Were Snowden truly a whistleblower inter- ested only in revealing U.S. government activities that he believed were illegal, he would have stood by his actions, pleaded his case and accepted the consequences of his actions in the U.S. legal system. Instead, he is running. His stay in Hong Kong likely coincided with the amount of time it took him to share whatever he knew about U.S. surveillance of China before he was spirited to Moscow to let them in on what our intelligence agencies have on Russia. Then it’s off to Cuba for a debriefing before he heads to Ecuador.

None of the places on Snowden’s itinerary has a free press or any of the other freedoms provided by our Bill of Rights. WikiLeaks is only interested in a free Internet when it comes at the expense of the United States.

“Mr. Snowden’s claim that he is focused on supporting transparency, freedom of the press and protection of individual rights and democracy is belied by the protectors he has poten- tially chosen — China, Russia, Ecuador, as we’ve seen,” White House spokesman Jay Carney said Monday.

The Obama administration has attempted to arrest Snowden by using international law, but that has been thwarted. Snowden is too high-valued an asset for China and Russia to just give him up, at least before they’ve drained every bit of information they can get from him. Once his usefulness has ended, it’s doubtful they’ll have a lot of use and trust in a man who would betray his own nation.

And in the end, that’s what Snowden did, and intended to do all along. He is a traitor.



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