Georgia Says

Columbus Ledger-Enquirer on Margaret Thatcher:

Any modern history that does not include Margaret Hilda Roberts Thatcher among the most important world leaders of the 20th century instantly sacrifices any claim to credibility.

Former British Prime Minister Thatcher, who died Monday at 87, all but remade the United Kingdom of the 1980s in her own ladylike yet unyielding image, much as her friend and ally Ronald Reagan remade the United States in his.

In many ways, Reagan and Thatcher were and are the bookends of late 20th century Western conservatism. Although Thatcher lacked Reagan’s seemingly effortless amiability, she was every bit his match in resolve. The “Iron Lady” label came courtesy of Soviet journalists, and would soon become a term of admiration and, to some, endearment.

Like Reagan, she came to power at a time when Britain was suffering from crises of both economics and national confidence, and saw bloated government as the heart of the problem. Unlike Reagan, Thatcher did not bring the advantages of fame, riches and instant name recognition to her political career. The daughter of a grocer and Methodist lay minister in Lincolnshire, Margaret Roberts came of age as the bombs of Hitler’s Luftwaffe were falling on England. She later said her sense of national resolve was born in that fire, and her sense of economics in her father’s store.

She unsuccessfully ran for a seat in Parliament in 1950 as a conservative candidate in a Labour-intensive district. She tried again the next year and lost again, but during the campaign met businessman Denis Thatcher, who would be her husband for more than half a century. She won a seat in Parliament in 1959 at the ripe age of 34, and became secretary of education in 1970.

She led the party to victory as prime minister in 1979. Her administration’s privatizing of state-run industries would hardly seem radical to most Americans: Among the government-operated institutions at the time were British Airways, Rolls-Royce, the coal and steel industries, a telecom company, gas, water and electrical utilities.

Supporters credited her with an economic revival; critics accused her of insensitivity to the wretchedly poor and of further widening England’s historically yawning social and economic chasms. But her convictions were unshakable.

Thatcher is said, by foes and admirers alike, to have had an absolute confidence in her own rightness. It was a trait that sometimes worked to her and her country’s advantage, as when she astutely saw in Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev a possible end to the Cold War; and sometimes to her detriment, as when she imposed a hugely unpopular tax in 1989 and was eventually ousted by her own party.

Thatcher was described as “a very divisive figure” by none other than Bernard Ingham, her own loyal press secretary. He also described her as “a patriot with a great love for this country.”



More Opinion

Georgia Says

The Times, Gainesville, Ga., on tax reform being overdue: April 15 was tax day. The marvels of electronic filing may have lessened somewhat ... Read More


A well-deserved and prudent raise

Coweta County School System employees should be a little happier this morning after the Board of Education restored one paid teacher day and ... Read More


Becoming a health care mecca

A rather depressing statement came out of the mouth of the CEO of Piedmont Healthcare during a breakfast speech earlier this week. “On ... Read More


Rants, Raves & Really?!?

REALLY?!?: A Coweta man was arrested and charged with trafficking methamphetamine after investigators discovered about one-half pound of the ... Read More


Georgia Says

Savannah (Ga.) Morning News on an Iranian radical's request for a U.S. visa: In 1979, Hamid Abutalebi was among the Iranian radicals who ill ... Read More

Who we really are

Glancing at The Newnan Times-Herald over the last few days, a prospective resident would have second thoughts about moving here. Funerals fo ... Read More