Feds seek 44 percent drop in Ga. carbon emissions

by The Associated Press

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ATLANTA (AP) -- The Obama administration wants Georgia to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by more than 40 percent over the next 16 years.

The Environmental Protection Agency on Monday announced targets for reducing carbon emissions in individual states. It's a major part of the administration's effort to combat climate change. The government says states will decide how to make the changes.

Representatives from Gov. Nathan Deal's office say the Georgia Environmental Protection Division will review the proposal to determine the impact it will have on the state and its economy. A spokeswoman for Deal says it's too early for the governor to comment on the proposal.

Southern Company officials said in a statement that the utility will work with federal and state regulators to form guidelines consistent with federal regulations.



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