On 42 Acres

Giant baseball for sale on Happy Valley

by Bradley Hartsell

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Adam Brennan, whose dad, David, owns the land, stands in front of the giant 6-foot baseball that stands on the Brennan property for sale.

David Brennan isn't sure why people care, but the fact is, people keep asking him about it.

Brennan owns the land and, by association, the giant 6-foot baseball that's visible from the road and draws curiosity from those driving by.

The story of the baseball goes like this: For the Atlanta Olympics, the city conceived the ill-advised plan of producing a bunch of giant baseballs (like the ones sitting outside of Turner Field) to sell to sponsors who could put their logo on a ball and place it somewhere in the city, all to promote the 1996 Olympics.

The balls didn't sell very well so they stored them at Oakland Cemetery. A guy by the name of Ray Armada bought them from the city, then put them up for sale.

Brennan was a board member for the Newnan-Coweta Pony League, who wanted to buy the three balls from Armada for the Temple Avenue Complex. Brennan volunteered to pick up the balls and Armada decided to give the Pony League a ball in addition to three they bought. The board decided Brennan should keep the fourth ball since it was his time and truck that got the balls.

So, in 2002, Brennan got the ball and had David Hollums of Prime Fabrications paint on the red stitches, which were molded but left white in production. He stored the ball in his barn until 2007, when he decided to display the oversized sphere in the field.

Ever since then, people have been curious about its origins.

Brennan bought a 67-acre piece of property in 1998 as an investment. For years, the land was owned by the Redwine family, whose Redwine Cemetery is actually located next to the land. He bought it for $5,000 an acre and was able to turn it into $20,000 an acre when he sold off 25 acres between January 2008 and September 2009. Now left with the 42.6 acres he put on the market in February, Brennan says he's ready to sell the last of it.

'I'm 54 years old and don't have the affection for it anymore,' he said.

Brennan kept expressing doubt that this huge baseball meant anything to anybody, but people who continually stop by and snap pictures tell him otherwise.

'The land is free, the baseball is $500,000,' jokes Brennan.

Despite the novelty of the artifact sitting in the field, Brennan is simply selling the property for its value. Its listing on FarmFlip. com doesn't make mention of the baseball - instead, it touts its creek and barn. The land certainly holds its own merits, but potential buyers should consider having a little piece of oddball Coweta history.



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