Georgia Says

Savannah (Ga.) Morning News on an Iranian radical's request for a U.S. visa:

In 1979, Hamid Abutalebi was among the Iranian radicals who illegally seized the U.S. Embassy in Tehran and held 52 Americans for 444 days.

Today, he wants a U.S. visa so he can enter this country and serve as Iran's ambassador to the United Nations.

This request is an insult to America.

President Obama shouldn't just deny it. He should send back Abutalebi's application form in tiny little pieces.

Many younger Americans weren't alive when Iranian demonstrators burst through the doors at the American embassy and took everyone inside hostage. President Jimmy Carter correctly called these captives "victims of terrorism and anarchy." Some were beaten and tortured. Others were forced to undergo mock executions or play Russian roulette.

Not surprisingly, Abutalebi argues he was an interpreter and negotiator. Not someone who had a pistol or rifle in his hand.

But there's no difference between these roles. He was a terrorist who was part of this criminal mob. He has no business in this country.

This week, a bipartisan group of 29 U.S. senators sent Obama a letter, urging that the State Department reject Abutalebi's request. It includes liberals like Chuck Schumer of New York and conservatives like Ted Cruz of Texas. Georgia senators Johnny Isakson and Saxby Chambliss have signed it as well.

Isakson has called on the Senate to approve a bill that would compensate the hostages, who were released shortly after President Reagan took office. Each have received $50 per day, or about $22,000 each, from the U.S. government for their days in captivity. Isakson wants to boost that amount, using a surcharge added to penalties assessed against companies that do business with Iran in violation of U.S. sanctions.

His bill deserves support. In the meantime, older Americans haven't forgotten the misery of the hostage crisis and the daily updates on "Nightline." Iran's radicalized leaders haven't done much to change their ways since then either.

None of the hostage-takers are welcome on American soil. They are goons, not diplomats. Abutalebi's selection as Iran's envoy to the U.N. is an obvious slap in this country's face. Obama must return the favor.

The Albany (Ga.) Herald on the need for mental health for the military:

Investigators may never know exactly why a U.S. soldier, Ivan Lopez, went on a homicidal rampage at Fort Hood, killing three people and wounding 16 more before, when confronted by a military police officer, he turned his gun on himself.

On Thursday, however, Lt. Gen. Mark Milley did make a statement on what most likely was the underlying cause — mental disorder. "We have very strong evidence that he had a medical history that indicates unstable psychiatric or psychological conditions," Milley told reporters.

Speaking to a U.S. Senate committee, Army Secretary John McHugh said the 34-year-old Lopez "was undergoing a variety of treatments and diagnoses for mental health conditions, ranging from depression to anxiety to some sleep disturbance."

Lopez, who served in the Puerto Rico National Guard and who had been in the Army since 2008, was prescribed medications to deal with the mental health issues, McHugh said.

This is the second time a deadly shooting has taken place at Fort Hood. In 2009, former psychiatrist Nidal Hasan, then an Army major, created an even bigger bloodbath by killing 13 and wounding 32 others. In Hasan's case, the murders and assaults were steeped in his twisted view of religion. Convicted of the murders, he is awaiting lethal injection. Beside the location, another common element was where Lopez bought the .45-caliber weapon he sneaked on base — the same Guns Galore store where Hasan bought his.

It also follows the Washington Navy Yard shooting in September in which a dozen were slain and four were hurt before police killed the gunman, and last month's killing of a sailor by a civilian aboard a Navy ship at Norfolk, Va.

These attacks on our military by those they should be able to trust point to two things. One, security at our bases must continually be reviewed and improved. We send these brave men and women to protect freedom from those who would do us harm. We should ensure their safety, especially on U.S. soil.

Second, more needs to be done in the way of treating active military personnel and veterans who are facing mental challenges from their work on behalf of their country. With two long-term wars since Sept. 11, 2001, those who serve in our armed forces have been asked to carry a heavy burden, one that, according to findings of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, leaves them at greater risk for physical and mental problems.

What's in place is not working as well as it needs to. Getting the proper help for men and women who have placed their health and their lives on the line for our nation needs to be a greater priority for the military, the politicians in Washington and the American people. Those of us who live in freedom because of what our military has done for us should demand it.



More Opinion

Georgia Says

The Augusta (Georgia) Chronicle on unswerving ideals: He epitomized the expression "doing well by doing good." His chicken sandwiches made ... Read More


The president and ISIS

The greatest threat facing America is terrorism. Today, that terrorism shows its face through ISIS. They rape, torture and kill men, women a ... Read More


Take a moment

On this day in 2001, at 8:46 a.m. Eastern time, American Airlines Flight 11 crashed into floors 93-99 of the North Tower of the World Trade ... Read More


Rants, Raves & Really?!?

A look back at last week’s highs, lows and whatevers: REALLY?!? A pit bull terrier was put down after being stabbed at the local PetSm ... Read More


Georgia Says

Albany (Georgia) Herald on Internet thieves: The idea of privacy is becoming more novel by the day. Technology has changed life over the pas ... Read More

Our priorities are skewed

The body of a missing teen is pulled from a creek in an upscale neighborhood, and his murder remains unsolved. A popular high school student ... Read More