Georgia Says

Columbus Ledger-Enquirer on chemical execution confidentiality legislation

Georgia lawmakers are considering a House bill to classify the names of companies that supply drugs for chemical execution as “a confidential state secret.” Exactly what other kinds of secrets there are besides “confidential” ones is the least of the questions.

Why should such information be exempt from open government laws? Georgia taxpayers provide huge chunks of hard-earned money for the processes of criminal justice, including capital punishment.

In fact, this proposed law would shield all information that reveals the name and contact information of any person or organization participating in an execution, including anyone who “manufactures, supplies, compounds or prescribes the drugs.”

Well, that should pretty much cover it. Is there anybody or anything involved in capital punishment in Georgia we ARE allowed to know about?

This bill’s backers say it would protect those involved in lethal injection — a process ordered by courts of law in what is supposed to be an open and accountable government.

Protect them from what?



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