New Grantville group opposes mayor’s actions

Grantville’s first official political action committee will be holding a public meeting on Saturday.

The Grantville Coalition of Concerned Citizens will hold a public meeting on Saturday at 2 p.m. at the Griffin Street Park. “We will convene under the pavilion,” said Selma Coty, a former city council member who is vice chair for GCCC.

Attendees are asked to bring lawn chairs because of limited seating. GCCC requested permission to meet at the city hall in the Glanton Municipal Complex, but that request was turned down at a recent city council meeting. In February, a group of Grantville residents met to discuss concerns. The group was worried “about the direction in which our city was going,” Coty said.

Specific actions that bothered members of the group centered around Mayor Jim Sells canceling two contracts that had been approved by the previous council. “One was a contract to install fire hydrants on Meriwether Street, and the other was to build a skateboard park on Griffin Street,” Coty said.

In the November elections, Leonard Gomez and David Riley were elected to the Grantville City Council. They now hold seats previously held by Rochelle Jabaley and Coty. Sells actively supported the election of Gomez and Riley.

At the February meeting, there were concerns that Sells – now having allies to create a majority on the council – might eliminate the recreation board. “Although he has backed away from this proposal, there are no assurances that the question is dead,” Coty said.

“His three-vote majority has also allowed him to increase his discretionary spending from $2,000 to $10,000, to have the city attorney report directly to him, to fire the city manager and to increase deficit spending,” Coty stated. Those issues, she said, represent “only a few of the GCCC’s concerns.”

A goal of the GCCC is “to neutralize the current majority” by electing a new mayor and council members, according to Coty. The group is seeking representatives who “embrace the diversity in our community, respect citizens’ rights, enforce and abide by our local laws and who have an ‘I work for you’ attitude,” she explained.



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