Read Captions Across America

Welch Elementary participates in closed captioning challenge

by Staff Reports

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Submitted Photo

Pictured during Welch Elementary School’s Read Captions Across America Day are front, from left, Welch parent volunteer Michelle Rich, Abbigail Antrim, Will Knight, Madi Beth Knight, Sara Teague and Kevin Banks; back, kindergarten teacher Angela Nouryeh, Viviana Ojeda Millan, Shelby Brown, Haylie Goss, Sofie Debosschere, Harper Powell, Aaron Abke, and Welch Media Specialist Jennifer Beard.

Students at Welch Elementary School honored Dr. Seuss’ birthday by participating in Read Captions Across America Day.

The goal of the day was to celebrate reading and to educate students and parents about the many benefits of utilizing captioned media at home. Students dressed as Dr. Seuss book characters and enjoyed watching the Lorax by Dr. Seuss with opened captioning. Students were then challenged to turn on captioning at home on their televisions and watch a captioned show, experiencing media in the same way as hearing impaired students.

Captioning is the process of converting the dialogue and sounds heard on video into text that is then printed onto the media—television programming, DVDs, movies at a cinema, web- streamed media.

Captions ensure equal access to content for students with hearing loss. If a student who is hearing impaired utilizes interpreter services, it is still important to have captions on media. 

It is difficult to simultaneously attend to both the video and the information being delivered by the interpreter. It is also challenging to follow along with a written transcript while watching media.

The lighting is typically poor, the eyes bounce back and forth through a large visual field from screen to written text, and without auditory feedback or with distorted auditory feedback, and it is hard to track along with the programming.

Research on persons without hearing loss indicates that captioned television can enhance reading comprehension, listening comprehension, vocabulary acquisition, word recognition, decoding skills, and overall motivation to read, according to experts.

Captions can benefit hearing students who are visual learners, second-language learners, and can help discern information when the audio is not clear or the speaker has an accent that is difficult to understand.


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